If you are over 50 years old, you’ll need Amanda Augustine’s 13 tips to help with your resume

  1. Focus on your recent experience. The further along you are in your career, the less relevant your earlier experience becomes. The last 10 to 15 years is really what matters, so focus on detailing those years of experience that are related to your job search. If you really want to add older work experience, add it to a section of your resume called “Career Note.”
  2. Eliminate older dates. Not every position you’ve held needs to have the start and end dates listed on your resume. Remove the dates related to work experience, education, and certifications if they don’t fall within that 10-to-15-year window.
  1. Limit your resume to two pages. Recruiters spend less than 10 seconds reviewing each resume and application that comes across their desk before deciding if the candidate deserves further consideration. If you want your resume to be noticed by hiring managers, keep it short so they get the gist of your work history within that 10-second timeframe.
  1. Avoid a “jack-of-all-trades” approach. Although you might have held multiple roles throughout your career, your resume should be tailored to support your current career objective rather than providing a general summary of your entire work history.
  1. Optimize your resume with keywords. Improve the chances of your resume making it past the applicant tracking system and on to a human by adding keywords within your resume from the job description.
  1. Upgrade your email address. Don’t give employers a reason to believe you aren’t tech-savvy. Ditch your AOL or Hotmail email account for a free, professional-looking Gmail address that incorporates your name.
  1. List your mobile phone number. Only list your cell phone number on your resume so that you answer the phone yourself in addition to controlling the voicemail message potential employers and recruiters hear.
  1. Join the LinkedIn bandwagon. If you’ve avoided using LinkedIn in the past, now’s the time to create a profile that promotes your candidacy to employers. Once your profile is complete, customize your LinkedIn profile URL and add it to the top of your resume.
  2. Showcase your technical proficiencies. Show employers that you’ve kept up with the latest tools and platforms related to your field by creating a small section toward the bottom of your resume that lists your technical proficiencies.
  1. Customize your online application. Small tweaks to your resume can make a big difference in determining whether your online application reached a human being for review. After reviewing the job listing more closely, make small edits to customize your resume so that it clearly reflects your qualifications.
  2. Ditch the objective statement. Avoid using a run-of-the-mill objective statement that’s full of fluff and focuses solely on your own wants and needs. Instead, replace it with your elevator pitch, which should be a brief paragraph summarizing your job goals and qualifications.
  3. Aim for visual balance. How your resume is formatted is just as important as the information itself. Focus on leveraging a combination of short blurbs and bullet points to make it easy for the reader to quickly scan your resume and find the most important details that support your candidacy.
  4. Focus on achievements, not tasks. At this point in your career, recruiters are less concerned with the tasks you’ve completed and more interested in learning what you’ve accomplished. Use bullet points to describe the results you’ve achieved and the major contributions you’ve made that benefited your employers.

Don’t forget to check out my source at TopResume